Accused rapist could move into victim's neighborhood

by: Ken Lemon Updated:


CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Darrell Gore is accused of rape but a judge just threw out the charges against him because of his mental disability.
His accuser said she's worried the ruling could mean Gore could move to her neighborhood.

Eyewitness News reporter Ken Lemon uncovered several other claims of violence against women in Gore's history and why there are big questions about where he should live.
Gore would be in danger in prison because of his mental disability but the mental facility he's in now said he's a danger to both staff and other patients.

ARTICLE: Rape charges dropped against mentally challenged man 

There are two options left and one makes his accuser terrified.
"I think it was wrong," the accuser said.
She is not happy that charges against Gore were dismissed because the mentally-challenged suspect couldn't understand the charges against him.
Now he will either be placed in a facility that can handle him or go back to live at his mother's home that is in the same neighborhood where his accuser lives. 
"He is a threat," the accuser said.

Gore, who has an IQ of 45, has been accused of attacking women in the past.
Police said in November 2007, Gore went into the room of a patient at CaroMount Regional Medical Center, kissed her on her neck, rubbed her and tried to get her out of bed.
Hospital staff stopped him.
In September of 2009, he went into a neighbor’s home and grabbed her around the neck, according to police.
Another neighbor stopped him.
In both cases, the victims decided not to file charges because of Gore's mental challenges.
The next month he reportedly went into the current accuser's home, ignored a warning shot she fired and took the gun and knife she used to defend herself.
After the incident, Gore told police, "I know what I did was wrong and I don't know why I did it."
The victim said, "I'm not the first person he has done this to. I won't be the last."
She is worried he may move back into her neighborhood.
Workers at Broughton Hospital in Morgantown said they will keep Gore until they transfer him to a more secure facility.
"It’s extraordinarily upsetting," said Norma Aguilar-Freyre, a victim's advocate.
Victim's rights advocates said hospitals can't keep Gore forever.
They can release him without notifying the victims.
"He is going to be out in the community in our midst and there is nothing we can do about it,” Aguilar-Freyre said.
Advocates are looking for legal ways to keep Gore in the hospital.

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