Children caught in crossfire of immigration debate

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. - There was a show of support in Charlotte for children who have come to the United States seeking asylum.
 
Some of them are facing deportation.

Nine-year-old Igdalia Ochoa witnessed killings and rapes as she fought to get out of Honduras, and now it will be left up to a judge to decide if she'll have to go back.
 
Marisela Morales, a student in international studies at the University of North Carolina- Charlotte, said she met 9-year-old Igdalia Ochoa through her work with the Latin American Coalition.

“I could only imagine what a child her age could've gone through,” Morales said.

She said Ochoa spent weeks living in a shelter in Honduras before making it to the American border alone in hopes of making it to Charlotte to live with her parents.

“She had experienced sightings of killings and she was threatened by the gang violence there,” Morales said.

Ochoa stayed at the border for weeks before her parents were able to find the money to get her to the United States.

Morales said a coyote, a person known for smuggling immigrants into the U.S., was waiting for the cash.

Now, Ochoa’s future is uncertain after she faced a judge Wednesday in Charlotte who could decide if she'll be deported to Honduras.

A group met Wednesday night in hopes to bring about awareness and save the hundreds of children.

It could be a few months before a judge renders his decision and until then, Ochoa will live in Charlotte with her parents.

President Barack Obama is considering making some changes to the legal immigration system.

One change would be the way green cards are counted. Officials said that could free up some 800,000 visas.

The move would lessen the bottleneck for businesses seeking global talent and shorten the line for those seeking green cards for relatives.