DNCC CEO speaks on economic benefits of convention

by: Scott Wickersham Updated:

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - It's been three months since the Democratic National Convention launched Charlotte into the national spotlight.

It could take another month to figure out what kind of economic benefits the Queen City saw from the convention.

Eyewitness News spoke with Dr. Dan Murrey, the man in charge of getting the convention off the ground.

Channel 9 met Murray Friday afternoon outside his office at OrthoCarolina.

The job most people will remember him for was CEO of the DNC host committee.
"We were charting new territory," Murrey said.

The toughest question he faced leading up to the DNC surrounded how much money the committee raised without corporate donations.

Murrey admits it was a challenge.

"Not only were we having to develop new ways of raising money, but we also had to train donors that this was an objective of the campaign," Murrey said.

They fell short of that fundraising goal, but Murrey said they exceeded their goals in other areas -- like hiring 47 percent of vendors from minority and diverse groups around Charlotte.

"It was a big deal for me," said Karen Lawrence, who was hired to help plan events. "I'm a small company. A minority company. It put me on the map and gave me some national attention."

Politics aside, Murrey said he thinks the convention was something every Charlottean can be proud of.

With Republicans coming into town in January for their winter business meeting, Channel 9 asked if he thinks they, too, might bring a convention here.

"It's a great opportunity now for us to look at other conventions, like the RNC, coming here. I think it would be exciting for the city. I would love it if that would happen," Murrey said.

“Not only were we having to develop new ways of raising money. But we also had to train donors that this was an objective of the campaign,” Murrey said.

They fell short of that fundraising goal, but Murrey said they exceeded their goal in other areas, like hiring 47 percent of vendors from minority and diverse groups around Charlotte.

 “It was a big deal for me,” said Karen Lawrence, who was hired to help plan events. “I'm a small company. A minority company. It put me on the map and gave me some national attention.”

Politics aside, Murrey  said he thinks the convention was something every Charlottean can be proud of.

With Republicans coming into town in January for their winter business meeting,  Channel 9 asked if he thinks they too might bring a convention here.

“It’s a great opportunity now for us to look at other conventions like the RNC coming here. I think it would be exciting for the city i would love it if that would happen,” Murrey said.

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