Police: Man with Blow Pop in pocket tried to lure girl into car

by: Dave Faherty Updated:

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NEWTON, N.C. —

A man is in jail after police said he used a Blow Pop to try to kidnap an 11-year-old girl and now investigators are trying to figure out if he's done this before.
 
Police said Malcolm Bodie tried to pick up the young girl about 6 p.m. Wednesday then his car was spotted less than a half mile away in front of the Newton Police Department.
 
A police sergeant in Newton couldn't believe his eyes when he walked through the doors at the department and spotted the car driving by.
 
Seconds earlier, he heard the description after police got a call from a repair shop nearby.
 
Danny Tibbs was working on a car at Jump Automotive when he first saw the white Chevrolet pull into the parking lot and then heard the girl’s cry for help.   
 
"When she ran across the parking lot you could tell she seemed frantic,” Tibbs said. “When she got in the office she was crying and screaming."
 
Police said the girl was walking along south College Avenue when Bodie tried to get her into his car.
 
Bodie is jailed under a $50,000 bond and charged with attempted second-degree kidnapping.  
 
Mike Murphy owns the garage and is the child's grandfather.
 
"(He's) stupid, if you ask me,” Murphy said. “Because just down from the Police Department. This guy is not very bright and this guy needs to be in jail.”
 
Sgt. Spencer Cline spotted the suspect’s car as it drove by the Police Department, which had just gotten the 911 call from the garage.    
 
Officers stopped Bodie’s vehicle and found a Blow Pop in Bodie's pocket. 
 
Investigators want to know if there are more cases.
 
"That is a possibility,” said Chief Don Brown with the Newton Police Department. “Are we concerned that is a possibility and are we looking into that? Yes we are."
 
Murphy is thankful for the quick response by police and hopes if Bodie is responsible, he doesn't go anywhere. 

"Stay in jail for a longtime,” Murphy said. “And I hope there is some good jailhouse justice, too."
 
Murphy also gives a lot of credit to the school system for taking a role in teaching children what to do in child abduction cases.