Paula Broadwell hires communications firm to represent her

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. —

Cameras flashed as Paula Broadwell's family came home on Monday night.

While the woman at the center of the CIA scandal was silent, her husband, Dr. Scott Broadwell, said a few words.

"I think you guys should probably clear on out. Thanks," said Scott.

Paula Broadwell may now have some help in dealing with all this attention.

Advertising Age, which is an industry publication, is reporting Broadwell has hired Glover Park Group.

The mid-sized, Washington-based firm is known for its work in public affairs, government affairs and crisis communications, Ad Age said.

The firm's consultants include Dee Dee Myers who served as White House press secretary for President Bill Clinton.

It is not clear what advice they are giving the Broadwells.

Also on Tuesday, Natalie Khawam, who is the twin sister of a Florida socialite  Jill Kelley, who sparked the investigation, is expected to hold a press conference to explain her own relationship with Petraeus.

It was a calmer scene on Monday night than it had been earlier, as Paula Broadwell tried to avoid the cameras outside of her home.

Her car door ended up hitting a photographer's camera leaving a cut on Nell Redmond's face.

"She got in the car, the door slammed. I got hit. The camera and the door me --that's all I know," said Redmond.

Redmond said she didn't believe there was any malicious intent.

Currently, federal prosecutors are deciding whether Broadwell should face charges of mishandling classified government information.

She is accused of taking secret files from secure buildings and storing them on a personal computer as well as at her home.

Sources told ABC News that some of the files are old, and there is no indication, so far, that Broadwell intended to harm national security, but they said she could be disciplined by the military.

"The whole thought or idea that you have classified information on your personal computer at home, I'm sure violates some Army regulations if nothing else," said former FBI agent and ABC News consultant Brad Garrett.

ABC News reports that Broadwell is cooperating and could pursue a plea deal that would not call for jail time.

Meanwhile, ( former CIA Director General David Petreaus has maintained he never gave Broadwell classified information.

On Sunday, when Paula Broadwell's husband came home,  he said they would have a comment soon, but still no official statement has been given from the family.