Tuition hike proposed for UNC Charlotte students

By: Alexa Ashwell

Updated:

CHARLOTTE - More than 27,000 students currently attend the University of North Carolina Charlotte and that number is only expected to increase.

Increased enrollment and state budget cuts are the two main reasons the University said it submitted a proposal to the UNC Board of Governors to increase tuition and fees for full time in-state and out-of-state students.

“We are adding students with fewer resources because the budget as a whole in North Carolina is being cut,” said Elizabeth Hardin, who is the vice chancellor of business affairs at UNCC.

The proposed increase for undergraduate in-state and out-of-state tuition and fees are as follows:

Full-time undergraduate/in-state           

2014- 2015
Base rate:                                                        $6,179.00

2015-2016                                                   3.3% increase
                                                                            $205 per year
New base rate:                                              $6,384.00 

2016-2017                                                   3.3% increase
                                                                            $213 per year
New base rate:                                              $6,597.00

Full-time undergraduate/out-of-state

2014-2015                                                    
Base rate:                                                       $19,350.00

2015-2016                                                  1.1% increase
                                                                           $205 per year
New base rate:                                             $19,555.00 

2016-2017                                                 1.1% increase
                                                                            $213 per year
New base rate:                                              $19,768.00

The rates do not include housing and meal plan costs. The university said part-time rates should also see an increase in costs.

“I’m a little disappointed because I pay a lot to go here but in the same sense I do understand,” said William Racine, who is a junior at UNCC.

“I don’t really see the big difference but it does all add up,” said Tara Jones, who is also a junior at UNCC.

“I’m already having enough trouble now,” said one freshman, who is an out-of-state student.

Mixed emotions university officials said they are sensitive to even after last year’s tuition freeze. 

“That was done in recognition of coming out of the great recession,” said Hardin.  “There was a need to be sensitive to family resources and the availability of funds. The most important thing we’ve done moving forward is focus on retention and graduation.  The University of North Carolina Charlotte still represents a great bargain.”

The UNC Board of Governors is expected to vote on the proposal in February.

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