Making a positive change in my community


My great Aunt Doris C. in Florida May 1976. This photo was taken shortly after her mastectomy at age 55. She was cancer free for 11 years and passed away in 1987 at 66 years old.

Hi – my name is Lindsey and I’m a member of Team 9/64, participating in the 2013 Avon Walk.

“Be the change you wish to see in the world” is my favorite quote, summarized from Gandhi. I’m walking in the 2013 Avon Walk for Breast Cancer to make a positive change in my community. I am guilty of living the “rat race” – working long hours, staying connected, worrying about my diet, rushing to the gym, me, me, me, run, run, run.

What have I done to help others? I volunteer occasionally, donate to the church and charities… but come on?!?!? Think about how much time we devote to really helping others. For the next 6 months, giving of my time for training, fundraising, and attending meetings is the least I can do to help make a positive change in the lives of people that need help.

The Avon Foundation is advancing access to care and finding a cure for breast cancer, with a focus on the medically underserved, including uninsured, low-income, or minority women in rural areas. The program strives to give all women access to high-quality breast cancer screening and treatment. For example, funds from the money raised from the Avon Walk will provide mammograms for the uninsured in an effort to beat breast cancer through early detection.

Early detection of breast cancer through screening mammography means that treatment can start earlier in the course of the disease, possibly before it has spread. If a woman doesn’t have insurance, a mammogram can cost her $300.00 or more. Now, imagine that the mammogram results show stage 3 cancer. She has a 40% chance of beating it; however, if she is uninsured she will incur thousands of dollars in medical bills. All of this added stress and worry to the already devastating news can be alleviated with help from the Avon Foundation.

My personal favorite benefit of this Walk’s fundraising is that some of the money raised provides wigs to women who have lost their hair to chemo. This probably is my vanity talking, my going to the gym and watching my diet, but what woman feels attractive bald? To me the wig symbolizes the beauty that all women carry, the hope on the road to recovery, maybe even that the worst is behind you, the “I fought like hell during this chemo and I’m coming back”.  Did you know those suckers can cost $700.00?

Two of my aunts, both named Doris, have had breast cancer. In 1976, my Aunt Doris C. was diagnosed with breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. Then in 2010, my Aunt Doris B. found a lump in her breast, which was removed, and is now cancer free. Here’s the positive change: in 1976, there weren’t over $390 million donated to breast cancer support. NFL players didn’t wear pink shoes during October, and the Avon Walk had not begun. The positive moves aimed at beating this disease are plentiful, but we cannot stop until there is a cure. Cancer has taken someone you love! Fight for them, and stop it from taking another loved one!

During the 3 minutes it took you to read this blog, someone just learned they have breast cancer, and in 10 more minutes someone will die of breast cancer. We can make a positive change to the bad news. Please support me in the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer by donating here. Be part of the positive change you wish to see in the world.