The First Family all had the Coronavirus

The First Family all had the Coronavirus
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and Barron Trump stand on the South Lawn of the White House on the fourth day of the Republican National Convention, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) (Evan Vucci)

The First Lady revealed on Wednesday that not only had she and her husband tested positive for the Coronavirus earlier this month, but also their ninth grade son Barron, as Melania Trump said in a written statement that the Trump family were all now healthy.

Asked about Barron, President Donald Trump told reporters his 14 year old son was, ‘fine.’

“I want people to know that I understand just how fortunate my family is to have received the kind of care that we did,” the First Lady wrote.

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“I pray for our country and I pray for everyone who is grappling with COVID-19 and any other illnesses or challenges,” she added.


“In one way I was glad the three of us went through this at the same time so we could take care of one another and spend time together,” she added.



As for her son Barron, Mrs. Trump said he had first tested negative - but then positive.


“Luckily he is a strong teenager and exhibited no symptoms,” the First Lady said.


The news that there were positive tests for all three members of the First Family came as the U.S. continues to see a surge in virus cases, with the 7-day average now over 50,000 new cases per day.


Hospitalizations for COVID-19 hit a record level of 1,017 in Wisconsin on Wednesday, as the state opened a field hospital to help deal with the rising number of virus cases needing medical attention.


Hospitalizations are up in Wisconsin, Indiana, and the Dakotas, Tennessee and other states, as the virus is moving through areas not hit in the first wave on the East Coast, or the second surge this summer in the South and Sun Belt states.



Back on the campaign trail after his own hospitalization, President Trump said Tuesday at a rally in Pennsylvania that the U.S is ‘rounding the turn’ on the virus.


But the data from a number of states shows a much different story, as cases go up, and hospitalizations follow as well.