The RNC and the DNC by the numbers: 5 things to know

The RNC and the DNC by the numbers: 5 things to know
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 27: U.S. President Donald Trump arrives on stage with first lady Melania Trump to deliver his acceptance speech for the Republican presidential nomination on the South Lawn of the White House on August 27, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump gave the speech in front of 1,500 invited guests. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The Democratic National Convention took place Aug. 17 to Aug. 20, and the Republican National Convention was hosted soon after from Aug. 24 to Aug. 27.

With Donald Trump and Joe Biden officially named the parties’ nominees, the presidential race is in high gear as voters plan to head to the polls in less than three months.

Here are five things to know:

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1) 66 days

As of Aug. 28, there are only 66 days until the November election. Early in-person voting starts in 45 days. Many people are already requesting absentee and vote-by-mail ballots.

2) Lower than average viewership

Both parties’ conventions had fewer people than normal tuned in to the political events. According to WFTV, the DNC garnered 19.5 million viewers in its first three days. That’s down 21% from 2016. About 16.5 million viewers tuned into the RNC across the six major networks, WFTV reported. That’s down 23% from 2016.

3) $7 billion

2020 is projected to be the most expensive political season ever with some estimates showing spending across all platforms and across all campaigns and candidates topping $7 billion, WFTV reported. 

4) 4 debates

There will be four debates in the coming weeks:

  • Sept. 29, Cleveland, Ohio - President Donald Trump versus former Vice President Joe Biden
  • Oct. 15, Miami, Florida - President Donald Trump versus former Vice President Joe Biden  
  • Oct. 22, Nashville, Tennessee - President Donald Trump versus former Vice President Joe Biden  
  • Oct. 7, Salt Lake City, Utah - Vice President Mike Pence versus Sen. Kamala Harris

5) Relection History

Since 1900, of all the presidents who were elected to full terms, only four presidents have lost reelection bids: William Howard Taft, Herbert Hoover, Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush.

The last president to lose reelection was George H.W. Bush in 1992. Since then, every president has served eight years in office. 

WFTV contributed to this report. Read more here.