Coronavirus: Government declares public health emergency

Despite efforts to stem the spread of coronavirus, the illness continues to spread.

Update 4:04 p.m. EST, Jan. 31: Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced that President Donald Trump will temporarily bar entry to the U.S. of foreign nationals believed to be a risk of transmitting the virus. The new restrictions begin Sunday afternoon.

Azar said via Twitter that while the risk is low they are trying to keep it that way.

The measure requires a 14-day mandatory quarantine for any American traveling from the Hubei province and proactive health screenings for Americans returning to the U.S. from the rest of China, Bloomberg reported.

Update 1:45 p.m. EST, Jan. 31: Politico is reporting that President Trump is considering evacuations of American citizens from China because of the virus.

Two officials with the administration told Politico that the order could be mandatory.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has ordered a 14-day quarantine for the 195 Americans, including diplomats and their families, who returned to the U.S. from Wuhan, China, CNN reported.

The group of people is staying at March Air Reserve Base in California. They were there under a voluntary three-day quarantine, but one person tried to leave and was told they could not leave for 14 days or until cleared, according to Riverside County Public Health, CNN reported.

More information on the coronavirus can be found on the Massachusetts Department of Public Health website.

At least 213 people have died from the virus, and more than 9,000 are infected in China. There are 140 confirmed cases outside of China with six in the U.S.

Update 11:12 a.m. EST, Jan. 31: Following the declaration by the State Department, multiple airlines are reassessing their travel schedules.

Both Delta Airlines and American Airlines are suspending flights to China, CNBC reported Friday.

United, Cathay Pacific, British Airways are among the airlines that have already either limited or outright canceled service to China due to the coronavirus outbreak, according to CNBC.

Delta will cancel flights going to China starting Feb. 6 and last through the end of April, the company announced. Flights will continue to and from China until then to help evacuate those who want to leave the country, company officials said.

For those who are impacted by the change, the can rebook their flights for trips starting after April 30 or request a refund. If those options do not suffice, travelers can contact Delta.

For those who have flights to or from China before the Feb. 6 stoppage, they can change flights with a change fee waiver, Delta said.

Original report: The U.S. Department of State has issued a travel advisory urging citizens not to travel to China due to the novel coronavirus.

The advisory warned travelers to be prepared for travel restrictions with little or no advance notice. Those already in China were also asked to consider departing using commercial means in the message.

Nonessential U.S. State Department personnel have been requested to defer travel to China.

Chinese authorities have suspended air, road and rail travel in the area around Wuhan, the city at the center of the outbreak, and placed restrictions on travel and other activities throughout the country.

Last week, the Department of State ordered the departure of all nonemergency U.S. personnel and their family members from Wuhan. The advisory noted that the U.S. government has a limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Hubei province.

China counted 9,692 confirmed cases with a death toll of 213, including 43 new fatalities Thursday evening. The vast majority of the cases have been in Hubei province and its provincial capital, Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak.

No deaths have been reported outside China.

Below are the explanations of advisory levels provided by the Department of State:

Level 1 - Exercise Normal Precautions: This is the lowest advisory level for safety and security risk. There is some risk in any international travel. Conditions in other countries may differ from those in the United States and may change at any time.

Level 2 - Exercise Increased Caution: Be aware of heightened risks to safety and security. The Department of State provides additional advice for travelers in these areas in the travel advisory. Conditions in any country may change at any time.

Level 3 - Reconsider Travel: Avoid travel due to serious risks to safety and security. The Department of State provides additional advice for travelers in these areas in the travel advisory. Conditions in any country may change at any time.

Level 4 – Do Not Travel: This is the highest advisory level due to a greater likelihood of life-threatening risks. During an emergency, the U.S. government may have very limited ability to provide assistance. The Department of State advises that U.S. citizens not travel to the country or to leave as soon as it is safe to do so. The Department of State provides additional advice for travelers in these areas in the travel advisory. Conditions in any country may change at any time.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.