Channel 9 presents “Talking about Race”: Starting an honest conversation

Channel 9 presents “Talking about Race”: Starting an honest conversation
(WSOC)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Channel 9 wants to help start the important process of learning how to have conversations about race and cultural differences.

We're bringing in leaders and experts to speak with people in the community about what can be done to make the Carolinas more inclusive.

[RESOURCE GUIDE: Talking About Race]

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‘We need white people to further this along’: What you can do to help fight systemic racism

Black and white people must come together to have tough conversations that push us forward in order to make a true change in racial inequality.

“So many people don’t want to take that first step because they’re scared it’s not a big enough step,” said Jennifer Moxley, who helped organize a protest in Charlotte on Saturday calling on white allies to stand publicly for black lives.

You can read more about how two local women have partnered to start a dialogue and resources to get started here.

Supporting Charlotte’s black-owned businesses

There are many ways to join in the fight for racial equality. You can donate money to a local grassroots organization. You can join a protest, if you feel you can do so safely. You can educate yourself and have conversations about racial justice.

But one of the most direct ways to support the black community is to shop at black-owned businesses, many of which have also been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. We have compiled a list of businesses you can support here.

How viral videos of killings of black men take a toll on black male mental health

With the recent videos of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery, Channel 9 spoke with psychotherapist Rwenshaun Miller about the impact this is having on the mental health of black males. You can hear from him here.

Interview: Expert in history of race in south talks about movement happening now

Mooresville couple to host anti-racism workshop

A couple in Mooresville has made it their mission to help people become anti-racist.

In the video below, they told Channel 9′s Gina Esposito it started after a conversation with their biracial children.

“Our eldest made this observation that we are all hues of brown. ‘Mommy, you are deep brown, Daddy you are light brown, and I’m medium brown. And I’m like that’s it.' That’s our unity right there,” said Lucretia Berry, mother and founder of BrowniCity.

Berry started hosting a five-week course called “What Lies Between Us” to help educate people about race. You can learn more about the course here.

Talking about Race: Mooresville couple to host anti-racism workshop

Charlotte Mecklenburg Library opens dialogue on race, policing with community book program

Books and movies often offer a great place to start conversations about race, equality, policing and racial profiling.

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Library chose to open up that dialogue when it chose “The Hate You Give” as its community book last year.

In the video below, Channel 9’s Genevieve Curtis explains more about the community conversations that came out of it.

Talking about Race: Charlotte Mecklenburg Library opens dialogue on race, policing with community book program

Two local pastors come together to address racial issues

In Matthews, a remarkable relationship has grown between the congregations of two churches. One, mostly black, and the other, mostly white.

It’s something that’s been developing for several years now.

“We realize that Sunday morning is the most segregated place in America,” said Larry Whitney, pastor at Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist Church. “We felt like we could do something to make that better, so we started visiting. My members would go visit his service and he would come -- some of his members visited mine.”

In the video below, learn how their personal friendship is creating change in their churches and their community.

Talking about Race: Two local pastors come together to address racial issues

Telemundo Charlotte anchor discusses impact on Hispanic community

Conversations about race go beyond black and white. It’s something everyone deals with, including our Hispanic community.

In the video below, anchor Daniel Viotto at our sister station, Telemundo Charlotte, explains what some say is a long-overdue discussion.

Talking about Race: Telemundo Charlotte anchor discusses impact on hispanic community

Understanding racial bias

Many people find it difficult to talk about race and bias, but it’s an important conversation that needs to happen.

In the video below, Channel 9’s DaShawn Brown talks to Diversity and Cultural Competence Educator Jennifer Davis, who explains why this discussion is necessary and offers guidance on how to handle this type of conversation.

Talking about Race: Diversity, cultural competence educator explains racial bias

The lasting impact of “redlining”

How did we get to this point? According to some experts, policies that ended decades ago are still influencing us now. “Redlining” was a housing policy in the 1930s that essentially blocked many people in black neighborhoods from getting financing.

A recent study found homeowners in “redlined” neighborhoods have earned 52 percent less, or more than $212,000 less, in home equity over the last 40 years in comparison to communities that were “greenlined.”

In the video below, Channel 9’s Ken Lemon talks with Charlotte historian Dr. Tom Hanchett about the lasting impact redlining has had on our local community.

Talking about Race: Local historian explains lasting impact of redlining

The 21-Day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge

It’s a program being used across the country with the idea that if you do something 21 days in a row, it will become part of your behavior pattern.

In the video below, Dr. Eddie Moore explains the program and its importance to Channel 9’s Susanna Black.

To learn more about the challenge, click here.

Talking about Race: Understanding the 21-Day Race Equity Challenge

One-on-one with Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney

In the video below Channel 9’s Erica Bryant talks one-on-one with Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney about the changes the department is ready to make and how officers are being trained as it relates to race.

Talking about Race: One-on-one with Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney

Mental health expert offers advice to help battle anxiety

If you are feeling overwhelmed by the unrest in our community, watch the video below to hear from Erika Ellis-Stewart of Mental Health America of Central Carolinas to understand the warning signs and how to cope with the anxiety you may be feeling.

Talking about Race: Mental health expert offers advice to help battle anxiety