• North Carolina fifth grader punished for calling teacher 'ma'am'

    Updated:

    TARBORO, N.C. - Parents of a fifth grader are concerned after their child was punished for referring to his teacher as "ma'am," according to ABC affiliate WTVD.

    Teretha Wilson said she noticed something was wrong Tuesday when her 10-year old son Tamarion got off the school bus from North East Carolina Preparatory School in Edgecombe County.

    "I asked him what happened. He said he got in trouble for saying 'yes ma'am'," explained Wilson.

    [1 in 10 Airbnb hosts in America is a teacher, report finds]

    Confused by his response, Tamarion pulled out a sheet of paper with the word "ma'am" written on it four times per line on both sides. He said his teacher told him to write the word on the sheet because he kept referring to her as "ma'am" despite her instruction not to.

    As part of his punishment, Tamarion had to have the paper signed by a parent.

    "He had a look on his face of disappointment, shame," said his father, McArthur Bryant.

    [Ex-Georgia teacher grabbed student by the throat, slammed him onto table]

    Wilson and Bryant said their children were taught to refer to elders as "ma'am" and "sir," and that Tamarion was not intending to be disrespectful.

    "At the end of the day as a father, to feel kind of responsible for that...knowing that I have been raising him and doing the best that I can, it's not acceptable," said Bryant.

    The parents said that Tamarion was hospitalized last month for a seizure-related activity, which included memory loss and hallucinations, something the teacher was unaware of.

    Wilson said the punishment was completed in class and was concerned that Tamarion was missing an opportunity to work during that time.

    During the encounter, Wilson said the teacher also told Tamarion that, "if she had something, she would have thrown it at him."

    [North Carolina elementary school teachers struggle to pass test to receive license]

    "It wasn't right. It wasn't professional. As a teacher, it wasn't appropriate. And I asked her why she thought it was okay to do that," said Wilson.

    Wednesday, Wilson met with the teacher and principal to discuss the incident and punishment. During that meeting, Wilson said the teacher acknowledged saying that, but was not serious and believed Tamarion was aware of that.

    When Wilson returned the signed punishment sheet, she also included a second sheet, which included Tamarion writing the definition of the word "ma'am."

    Following the meeting, Wilson requested her son be moved to a different classroom, which the principal agreed to do.

    While Wilson and Bryant are happy the school took action, they want to make sure a future incident doesn't happen again.

    "If it happened to my son, I'm pretty sure if not a week, a day, a month, a year, it will occur to somebody else's child," said Bryant.

    Next Up: