You may not find Chicken Supremes at your local Bojangles: Here’s why

CHARLOTTE — A shortage of poultry in America has been hitting the restaurant industry and now the Charlotte-based Bojangles said it is affecting one of its most popular menu items.

Popularity for chicken has made it difficult for the supply to keep up with the demand, Bloomberg reported.

“What can we say?” a Bojangles spokesperson said. “Our fans can’t get enough of our delicious, expertly seasoned fried chicken. While many of our restaurants are already selling our famous Chicken Supremes again, our supply team has been working around the clock to ensure all restaurants have what they need to fill orders. We appreciate your patience and understanding given the chicken shortage that’s affecting our entire industry.”

Bojangles is not alone.

Restaurant owners in the Charlotte area said there is a short supply of chicken wings, as well.

Eateries, such as Kristophers and Moe’s BBQ in Matthews, were forced to take wings off menus completely.

A representative with the North Carolina Poultry Federation told Channel 9, “breast meat and boneless dark meat are also very tight, just not as much as wings.”

The demand for wings is expected to last through the summer because it’s grilling season.

COVID-19 restrictions being lifted and eased will also increase the demand for wings.

“What we need is a 4-winged chicken,” the NCPF rep told Channel 9.

[RECENT COVERAGE: Restaurants say chicken wings in short supply]

Poultry supply companies have been working hard to keep up with the rise in sales at the restaurants, Bloomberg reported.

Wingstop Inc.’s chairman, Charles Morrison, discussed the problem.

“Suppliers are struggling just as many in our industry are, to hire people to process chicken, thus placing unexpected pressure on the amount of birds that can be processed and negatively affecting supply of all parts of the chicken in the U.S., not just wings,” he said.

KFC said it is also struggling to keep up with the demand for its new chicken sandwich, Bloomberg reported.